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A Theme-Based Yearlong Curriculum
   
                       
      E - F - G - H
December 2009
   
                       
      Kindergarten
The Letter E ~ Egyptian Clay Cartouches
   
           
         
           
      PROCEDURE

1. Students are asked to think critically about the art from Ancient Egypt.

2. Students are shown a PowerPoint slideshow with visual examples of sarcophagi, cartouches, canopic jars, jewelry and hieroglyphics.

3. Students are given a piece of clay and are taught how to wedge the clay, ensuring the removal of all air bubbles.

4. Students mold their clay into the form of a large cartouche, adding a small hole for raffia.

5. Students add hieroglyphic symbols onto their clay piece by etching them into the clay.

6. Students color areas with oil pastel, learning blending techniques.

7. Once the clay has been fired, students add blended oil pastel onto the clay in areas, using cool or warm colors.

8. Students watercolor wash over the entire piece of clay again, choosing either cool or warm colors.

9. Students embellish their piece with two plastic jewels.

10. Students add a piece of raffia to the final piece so they can wear or exhibit them.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

Kindergarten students will ...
• critically think about what art really is and, more specifically, what art meant to the
people of Ancient Egypt.
• look at the artifacts from this region from 2,500 years ago and then create their
own art using their new knowledge as inspiration.
• create a clay cartouche inspired by the ancient Egyptian cartouches.

MATERIALS

• Visual examples
• Clay and clay tools
• Oil pastels
• Watercolor
• Plastic jewels
• Hieroglyphic sheets
• Raffia

   
     
   
      Grade 1
The Letter H ~ Haring’s Hokey Hats
   
           
         
                       
     

PROCEDURE

1. Students are asked to think about what they look like.

2. Students are given samples of hats through time to see how they have changed and what they tell about people.

3. Students draw their portraits again, reiterating the first lesson of this unit.

4. Students are given a demo about how to draw the lines and shapes that make a hat.

5. Students are shown the art of Keith Haring and look for the patterns.

6. Students draw the shape of a creative hat on construction paper.

7. Students cut shapes out of construction-paper and glue these onto the hat in a pattern.

8. Students print a pattern onto their hats using up-and-down hand motions.

9. Students color layer with construction paper crayons, filling their art in with color.

10. Students finally pattern—alternating in A-B-A–style—three foam shapes and add puffy paint to complete their hokey hats inspired by Keith Harin

ASSESSMENT

Hang students’ art in class exhibits and have students sign their name to the art. Discuss the importance of hats throughout time, as well as the relevance of art and math and how closely related they are in terms of pattern design.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

First-grade students will ...
• think about the patterned art of Keith Haring.
• look at hats throughout time.
• use various media and techniques on one piece of artwork.

MATERIALS

• Permanent and regular markers,
multicultural and construction-paper crayons
• 8.5" x 8.5" white paper
• Visual samples of hats and of Haring’s art
• Construction paper
• Scissors and glue
• Tempera paint
• Sponges
• Foam shapes


VOCABULARY

Art History
Collage
Color
Hats
Layering
Patterns
Portraiture
Printmaking

   
     
   
      Grade 3
The Letter G ~ Greek Coins
   
           
     
   
                       
     

PROCEDURE

1. Students look at images of centuries-old Greek coins.

2. Students sketch several images of their own coin design, using columns, statues, etc.

3. Students wedge a piece of clay, getting the air bubbles out of the clay.

4. Students form their clay into a round circular shape to mirror that of a large coin.

5. Students etch their image into the surface of the clay.

6. Students add their name using Greek letters.

7. While the clay dries, students draw a coin that looks like the clay coin, coloring it with oil pastel and watercolor.

8. Once the clay coin has been fired, students paint them gold.

9. The “coin” and the drawing of it are hung together in a display.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

Second-grade students will ...
• learn about ancient Greek artists, specifically their money system via found coins.
• learn about the art of sculpture via clay.
• learn about the Greek alphabet.

MATERIALS

• Clay
• Images of ancient Greek coins and classical Greek columns
• Pencils
• Gold paint
• Oil pastels
• 6" x 6" white paper and mat board
• Hot glue
• Examples of the Greek alphabet

   
     
   
     

Grade 3
The Letter F ~ Finster’s Folk Art Faces

   
           
     
   
           
     

PROCEDURE

1. Students look at images of Howard Finster’s art, specifically his self-portraits.

2. Students draw the shape of their head, then add eyes, nose, mouth, ears, hair and neck.

3. Students outline all of their drawn lines with a permanent marker.

4. Students paint their face and neck, mixing acrylic skin tones to match their skin.

5. Students then color the rest of their art—irises, hair and shirt—using markers.

6. Once the paint has dried completely, students retrace their facial lines with permanent markers.

7. Students write a story about themselves on the face of their porrait, using a pencil and writing lightly, to mimic Finster’s pieces.

8. Once the story is complete, students cut out their faces, keeping about half an inch from their drawn line to their cut line.

9. Students mat these onto a piece of construction paper.

10. Students hang their artworks in the Finster installation!

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

Third-grade students will ...
• learn about the art of Howard Finster.
• discuss the art of self-portraiture.
• create a story about themselves to add to their artwork.
• mix paints to create their skin tone.

MATERIALS

• Finster’s art images
• 12" x 18" white drawing paper
• Pencils
• Permanent markers
• Mr. Sketch markers
• Skin-tone paints
• Scissors and glue
• Construction paper

   
     
   
     

Grade 5
The Letter E ~ Egyptian Sarcophagi

   
           
     
   
           
         
           
     

PROCEDURE

1. Students are asked to think critically about the art from Ancient Egypt.

2. Students are shown a PowerPoint slideshow with visual examples of sarcophagi, cartouches, canopic jars, jewelry and hieroglyphics.

3. Students select a partner and together they will create a two-dimensional image of a sarcophagus.

4. One student draws the outline of another onto a large sheet of butcher paper.

5. Students add hieroglyphics, images and their own patterned design to decorate their sarcophagi.

6. Students color areas with oil pastel, learning blending techniques.

7. Students watercolor wash over the entire piece, choosing either cool or warm colors.

8. Students embellish with gold paint and plastic jewels.

9. Students complete their rubric throughout the six weeks it takes to complete this lesson.

10. Art is hung in the halls for the community to enjoy!


LEARNING OBJECTIVES

Fifth-grade students will ...
• critically think about what art really is and, more specifically, what art meant to the people of Ancient Egypt.
• look at the artifacts from this region from 2,500 years ago and then create their own art using their new knowledge as inspiration.
• create a collaborative sarcophagi, working in teams of two to three people.

MATERIALS

• 12" x 18" black paper
• Visual examples
• White butcher paper
• Permanent pens
• Oil pastels
• Watercolor paint
• Brushes
• Gold paint
• Scissors
• Plastic jewels
• Hieroglyphic sheets

   
           
      >> Click here to view "F - Finster's Fantastic Folk Art Fun"

>> Click here to download "E - F -G - H" In a Printable PDF file
   
 
 
 

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